Blog

  • Get To Know Your Wrist Joint

    Get To Know Your Wrist Joint

    Category: Hand and Wrist
    Your wrist may seem like a simple part of the body, but your wrists and hands actually contain a high number of joints, bones, muscles, and ligaments, all of which allow your wrist to move in different directions as well as allowing your hands to function.

    Read More

  • It’s An Important Joint, So Don’t Ignore It

    It’s An Important Joint, So Don’t Ignore It

    Category: Shoulders
    Think of the last time you used your shoulders. Chances are, it was dozens of times today. You might not consciously think about how much you use them, but as soon as one or both of your shoulders is injured, you’re likely to realize just how important they are to your ability to function.

    Read More

  • A Range Of Motion And A Range Of Injuries

    A Range Of Motion And A Range Of Injuries

    Category: Shoulders
    Every time you lift an object, reach up to your cabinets to put the dishes away, swing a tennis racket, swim, or even drive your car, you’re using a very important joint in your body—your shoulder. Your shoulder joints actually have the largest range of motion of any of the joints in your body.

    Read More

  • Fast Facts About Knee Replacement Surgery

    Fast Facts About Knee Replacement Surgery

    Category: Knees
    If you’ve been informed knee surgery is a possible option to help relieve your severe pain, or if it’s being offered for an alternative reason, knowing the facts of a procedure can help alleviate stress. For nearly all patients, knee surgery is life-changing in a positive way.

    Read More

  • Fast Facts on Knee Anatomy

    Fast Facts on Knee Anatomy

    Category: Knees
    While the knee itself is the largest joint in the body, it functions as much more than a joint, as it connects several bones together. Slightly reminiscent of a song often heard in grade school, the knee connects the thigh bone, shin bone, kneecap, and fibula. The knee is also classified as a synovial joint, which means that the kneecap is filled with fluid.

    Read More

Pages [1] 2 of 2 | Next | Last